Poetic Trespass: Writing Between Hebrew and Arabic in Israel/Palestine

Author: Lital Levy Publisher: Princeton University Press, 2014 A Palestinian-Israeli poet declares a new state whose language, “Homelandic,” is a combination of Arabic and Hebrew. A Jewish- Israeli author imagines a “language plague” that infects Continue Reading →

Sailing the Water’s Edge: The Domestic Politics of American Foreign Policy

Authors: Helen V. Milner and Dustin Tingley Publisher: Princeton University Press, 2015 When engaging with other countries, the U.S. government has a number of different policy instruments at its disposal, including foreign aid, international trade Continue Reading →

Sound Rising from the Paper: Nineteenth-Century Martial Arts Fiction and the Chinese Acoustic Imagination

Author: Paize Keulemans Publisher: Harvard University Press, 2014 Chinese martial arts novels from the late 19th century are filled with a host of suggestive sounds. Characters cuss and curse in colorful dialect accents, vendor calls Continue Reading →

JEREMIAH OSTRIKER and LYMAN PAGE receive Gruber Cosmology Prize

The 2015 Gruber Foundation Cosmology Prize has been awarded to Jeremiah Ostriker and Lyman Page for “individual and collective contributions to the study of the universe on the largest scales.” The two share the prize Continue Reading →

ROBERT KEOHANE receives James Madison Award in American political science

Robert Keohane, professor of public and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School, received the 2014 James Madison Award from the American Political Science Association (APSA). The award, given once every three years, “recognizes an Continue Reading →

DAVID TANK receives Brain Prize for advance in microscopy

David Tank, the Henry L. Hillman Professor in Molecular Biology and co-director of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, has been named one of four winners of the Brain Prize, an honor that recognizes scientists who have Continue Reading →

Tiny delivery capsules for new drugs

Some drugs cannot be delivered via a normal pill or injection because they cannot readily dissolve in water. About 40 percent of new pharmaceuticals have this hydrophobic (water-fearing) character, and like a globule of oil Continue Reading →

Computer chip for point-of-care diagnosis

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Kaushik Sengupta and his team are developing a computer chip-based diagnostic system, which rests comfortably on a fingertip but contains hundreds of different sensors for simultaneous detection of disease-causing agents. Continue Reading →

Cosmic background: 51 years ago, an accidental discovery sparked a big bang in astrophysics

ON NEW YEAR’S DAY 2015, A BALLOON-BORNE SPACECRAFT ascended above Antarctica and snapped crisp photos of space, unobscured by the humidity of Earth’s atmosphere. Meanwhile, a telescope located 4,000 miles to the north, in the Continue Reading →

The Hub: A new center opens its doors … to student entrepreneurship

THE SOCIAL CAMPUS NETWORKING startup Friendsy began with a single campus network at Princeton and has since expanded to 230 campuses nationwide. This June, Friendsy was one of the first startups to move into the Continue Reading →

Wild birds: A trip to the market reveals species imperiled

THE SIGHT OF A SOUTHEAST ASIAN BIRD market rivals the din of one for being overwhelming. Thousands of wild-caught birds are packed into cages that hang from eaves and fill market stalls to the ceiling, Continue Reading →

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: The quest for clean energy continues

FUSION — the energy-making process that powers the sun — could provide us with a near limitless source of energy, ending our dependence on fossil fuels for making electricity. This summer, after a nearly three-year Continue Reading →

Imaging system tracks brain activity of a freely moving worm

TO EXPLORE HOW THE BRAIN controls behavior, researchers have for the first time captured the whole-brain activity of a freely moving animal, in this case a nematode worm called Caenorhabditis elegans. Using an imaging system Continue Reading →

Taming the network: Finding relationships in complex data sets

WHAT BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER IN ONLINE NETWORKS? Researchers (and advertisers) would like to know, but without access to personal profiles, the question is not easy. Finding previously undetected relationships in networks and complex data sets Continue Reading →

Listening in on bacterial communications

BACTERIA SPEAK TO ONE ANOTHER using a soundless language known as quorum sensing. In a step toward translating bacterial communications, researchers have revealed the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a signaling molecule involved in the Continue Reading →

Measles may weaken immune system up to three years

THE MEASLES VIRUS can lead to serious disease in children by suppressing their immune systems for up to three years, according to a study published in the journal Science on May 8, 2015. The study Continue Reading →

Energy and environment center opens its doors

WITH CONSTRUCTION ESSENTIALLY COMPLETE, researchers are moving into the new home of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, a 129,000-square-foot complex dedicated to research and teaching in areas involving energy efficiency, sustainable sources Continue Reading →

Elusive particles found

IN THE PAST YEAR, PRINCETON PHYSICISTS have detected two particles that were predicted decades ago to exist but had not been found until now. Both particles were detected using a scanning-tunneling microscope to image the Continue Reading →

Princeton-Fung Global Forum focuses on global health

IN NOVEMBER, the annual Princeton-Fung Global Forum brought health experts together in Dublin to address the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an increasingly connected world. Case studies of “modern plagues,” including the Ebola Continue Reading →

Bioengineering: Unlocking the secrets of human health

By Takim Williams RED-HOT RIVERS OF MOLTEN COPPER and aluminum alloys streamed from one receptacle to another. As an undergraduate watching the demonstration in a materials science class, Clifford Brangwynne was reminded of cells migrating Continue Reading →

Janet Currie investigates the building blocks of children’s success

By Michael Hotchkiss TRAINED AS A LABOR ECONOMIST, Janet Currie earned her doctorate at Princeton by studying strikes and arbitration. But as she began her academic career in the late 1980s, she shifted her focus Continue Reading →

Ashes, images and the survival of democracy

Ashes, images and the survival of democracy: Nathan Arrington searches for meaning in ancient Athens’ public cemetery By Catherine Zandonella IT’S AN OVERCAST AND WINDY DAY, cold for June, but a strawberry stand across the Continue Reading →