How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells

Princeton University researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and delta virus (HDV). The paper describing their Continue Reading →

Danger avoidance can be genetically encoded for four generations

Princeton University researchers have discovered that learned behaviors in worms of the species C. elegans can be inherited for multiple generations, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells. The paper detailing this Continue Reading →

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C

Small differences in a liver cell protein have significant impacts on hepatitis C virus replication in mice and humans, findings that could facilitate the development of a mouse model of the infection. The report, led Continue Reading →

For infection-fighting cells, a guideline for expanding the troops

T cells are like the special ops forces of the immune system, detecting and killing infected cells. When a new threat is detected, the cells ramp up from just a few sentry cells to a Continue Reading →

Bold and cold: A new faculty member and a new microscope explore life’s essential molecules

By Kevin McElwee At the end of a long underground hallway on the edge of campus, a door leads to a brightly lit room. Within looms an imposing 12-foot-tall machine, whose array of wires and Continue Reading →

Lights, camera, action – of genes in development

By Yasemin Saplakoglu MOLECULAR BIOLOGIST MIKE LEVINE likes to recall his childhood when he talks about the reason he came to Princeton. “I grew up near Hollywood and I always loved movies as a kid, so Continue Reading →

DAVID TANK receives Brain Prize for advance in microscopy

David Tank, the Henry L. Hillman Professor in Molecular Biology and co-director of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, has been named one of four winners of the Brain Prize, an honor that recognizes scientists who have Continue Reading →

Striking resemblance: A physical law may govern very different biological activities

FLOCKS OF BIRDS FLY ACROSS THE SKY in shifting configurations. In the retina of an eye, millions of neurons ignite in ever-changing combinations, translating light into meaningful images. Yet both of these seemingly random behaviors Continue Reading →

Math and music spark student’s research interests

WHILE PRINCETON SENIOR Alexander Iriza, of Astoria, New York, credits his parents for sparking his interest in math — his mother gave him math workbooks when he was a toddler — that was merely “a Continue Reading →

How to train your worm to explore the circuits involved in learning

AS AN UNDERGRADUATE, Angelina Sylvain was fascinated to learn that devastating declines in cognition and muscle coordination could be caused by changes in a single gene — the cause of Huntington’s disease. She was intrigued Continue Reading →

Princeton role in federal BRAIN initiative

Princeton neuroscientists are poised to play a leading role in revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain as outlined in President Barack Obama’s BRAIN Initiative, announced in April 2013. David Tank, co-director of the Princeton Continue Reading →