DAVID TANK receives Brain Prize for advance in microscopy

David Tank, the Henry L. Hillman Professor in Molecular Biology and co-director of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, has been named one of four winners of the Brain Prize, an honor that recognizes scientists who have Continue Reading →

Tiny delivery capsules for new drugs

Some drugs cannot be delivered via a normal pill or injection because they cannot readily dissolve in water. About 40 percent of new pharmaceuticals have this hydrophobic (water-fearing) character, and like a globule of oil Continue Reading →

Computer chip for point-of-care diagnosis

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Kaushik Sengupta and his team are developing a computer chip-based diagnostic system, which rests comfortably on a fingertip but contains hundreds of different sensors for simultaneous detection of disease-causing agents. Continue Reading →

Listening in on bacterial communications

BACTERIA SPEAK TO ONE ANOTHER using a soundless language known as quorum sensing. In a step toward translating bacterial communications, researchers have revealed the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a signaling molecule involved in the Continue Reading →

Measles may weaken immune system up to three years

THE MEASLES VIRUS can lead to serious disease in children by suppressing their immune systems for up to three years, according to a study published in the journal Science on May 8, 2015. The study Continue Reading →

Princeton-Fung Global Forum focuses on global health

IN NOVEMBER, the annual Princeton-Fung Global Forum brought health experts together in Dublin to address the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an increasingly connected world. Case studies of “modern plagues,” including the Ebola Continue Reading →

Bioengineering: Unlocking the secrets of human health

By Takim Williams RED-HOT RIVERS OF MOLTEN COPPER and aluminum alloys streamed from one receptacle to another. As an undergraduate watching the demonstration in a materials science class, Clifford Brangwynne was reminded of cells migrating Continue Reading →

Janet Currie investigates the building blocks of children’s success

By Michael Hotchkiss TRAINED AS A LABOR ECONOMIST, Janet Currie earned her doctorate at Princeton by studying strikes and arbitration. But as she began her academic career in the late 1980s, she shifted her focus Continue Reading →

Laser device may end pin pricks, improve health for diabetics

PRINCETON RESEARCHERS have developed a way to use a laser to measure people’s blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check Continue Reading →

Inventions Bridge the Gap between lab and marketplace

The college experience often involves at least one road trip, but most students do not bring along their faculty adviser. But last spring, two graduate students crammed into a rented Chevy Impala with Professor Mark Continue Reading →