From Math to Meaning. Artificial intelligence blends algorithms and applications

By Kevin McElwee Artificial intelligence is already a part of everyday life. It helps us answer questions like “Is this email spam?” It identifies friends in online photographs, selects news Continue Reading →

Bold and cold: A new faculty member and a new microscope explore life’s essential molecules

By Kevin McElwee At the end of a long underground hallway on the edge of campus, a door leads to a brightly lit room. Within looms an imposing 12-foot-tall machine, Continue Reading →

Treasure in ancient trash

By Kevin McElwee Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s Continue Reading →

When driverless ride-hailing services come to a curb near you

By Kevin McElwee When requesting a ride-hailing service, you may soon notice something missing: the driver. Fleets of autonomous electric vehicles could someday replace human-powered ride-sharing. Programming obstacles still stand Continue Reading →

Clifford Brangwynne selected as Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

By Adam Hadhazy Clifford Brangwynne, whose research explores the hidden order within cellular liquid, has been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Brangwynne, an associate professor of chemical and Continue Reading →

Diamonds’ flaws hold promise for new technologies

By Yasemin Saplakoglu DESPITE THEIR CHARM AND ALLURE, diamonds are rarely perfect. They have tiny defects that, to assistant professor Nathalie de Leon, make them ever so appealing. These atom-sized Continue Reading →

Let it flow: The ideas, the creativity, the findings, the impacts, the benefits to society

By Yasemin Saplakoglu THE RESEARCHERS in Princeton’s Complex Fluids laboratory are sometimes inspired by a cup of coffee or a permanent marker. Such everyday items may seem like odd subjects Continue Reading →

Self-powered system makes smart windows smarter

By Sharon Adarlo A new solar cell technology could make it inexpensive to create and install smart windows that automatically vary their tint to augment lighting, heating and cooling systems Continue Reading →

Emily Carter awarded Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics

PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY CROW Emily Carter, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been named the recipient of the 2017 Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics Continue Reading →

Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy and Security

Author: Brian Kernighan, professor of computer science Publisher: Princeton University Press, January 2017 Computers are everywhere. Some of them are highly visible, in laptops, tablets, cellphones and smart watches. But Continue Reading →

Better decision-making for the planet

By Yasemin Saplakoglu We might think we have control of the mix of decisions we make during the day. But it turns out that our brain gives us subconscious nudges, Continue Reading →

CITIES: Resilient • Adaptable • Livable • Smart

Innovations in building materials, design, water systems and power grids are helping to make cities more livable, say researchers in Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science By Bennett McIntosh Continue Reading →

Tiny delivery capsules for new drugs

Some drugs cannot be delivered via a normal pill or injection because they cannot readily dissolve in water. About 40 percent of new pharmaceuticals have this hydrophobic (water-fearing) character, and Continue Reading →

Computer chip for point-of-care diagnosis

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Kaushik Sengupta and his team are developing a computer chip-based diagnostic system, which rests comfortably on a fingertip but contains hundreds of different sensors for Continue Reading →

The Hub: A new center opens its doors … to student entrepreneurship

THE SOCIAL CAMPUS NETWORKING startup Friendsy began with a single campus network at Princeton and has since expanded to 230 campuses nationwide. This June, Friendsy was one of the first Continue Reading →

Taming the network: Finding relationships in complex data sets

WHAT BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER IN ONLINE NETWORKS? Researchers (and advertisers) would like to know, but without access to personal profiles, the question is not easy. Finding previously undetected relationships in Continue Reading →

Energy and environment center opens its doors

WITH CONSTRUCTION ESSENTIALLY COMPLETE, researchers are moving into the new home of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, a 129,000-square-foot complex dedicated to research and teaching in areas Continue Reading →

Bioengineering: Unlocking the secrets of human health

By Takim Williams RED-HOT RIVERS OF MOLTEN COPPER and aluminum alloys streamed from one receptacle to another. As an undergraduate watching the demonstration in a materials science class, Clifford Brangwynne Continue Reading →

COMPUTER SCIENCE: Internet traffic moves smoothly with Pyretic

AT 60 HUDSON ST. IN LOWER MANHATTAN, a fortress-like building houses one of the Internet’s busiest exchange points. Packets of data zip into the building, are routed to their next Continue Reading →

COMPUTER SCIENCE: Security check: A strategy for verifying software that could prevent bugs

IN APRIL 2014, INTERNET USERS WERE SHOCKED to learn of the Heartbleed bug, a vulnerability in the open-source software used to encrypt Internet content and passwords. The bug existed for Continue Reading →

RESILIENT SHORES: After Sandy, climate scientists and architects explore how to co-exist with rising tides

AFTER THE WIND, RAIN AND WAVES of Hurricane Sandy subsided, many of the modest homes in the Chelsea Heights section of Atlantic City, New Jersey, were filled to their windows Continue Reading →

Computer visions: A selection of research projects in Computer Science

Princeton’s Department of Computer Science has strong groups in theory, networks/systems, graphics/vision, programming languages, security/policy, machine learning, and computational biology. Find out what the researchers have been up to lately in Continue Reading →

A RISKY PROPOSITION: Has global interdependence made us vulnerable?

RISK IS EVERYWHERE. There’s a risk, for example, that volcanic ash will damage aircraft engines. So when a volcano erupted in Iceland in April 2010, concerns about the plume of Continue Reading →

FOUR PROFESSORS Receive Presidential Science Awards

Four professors received the 2013 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages Continue Reading →

Shell Structures for Architecture: Form Finding and Optimization

Edited by: Sigrid Adriaenssens, Philippe Block, Diederik Veenendaal and Chris Williams, with a foreword by Pritzker Prize Winner Shigeru Ban Publisher: Routledge: Taylor and Francis, 2014 This book presents contemporary Continue Reading →

Wetlands provide solutions for agricultural runoff

A PATCHWORK OF SMALL LAKES, forests and marshes surrounded by farms and suburbs, the Assunpink Wildlife Management Area in central New Jersey is an ideal place to track the effects Continue Reading →

Light-splitting crystals from inexpensive ingredients

HIGHLY PURIFIED CRYSTALS that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing these crystals Continue Reading →

Entrepreneurship at Princeton: An interview with Mung Chiang

PROFESSOR MUNG CHIANG has integrated fundamental research on computer network optimization with several successful business ventures. As director of the Keller Center, which expands the scope of engineering education to Continue Reading →