ROBERT KEOHANE receives James Madison Award in American political science

Robert Keohane, professor of public and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School, received the 2014 James Madison Award from the American Political Science Association (APSA). The award, given once every three years, “recognizes an Continue Reading →

DANIEL KAHNEMAN Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom

Daniel Kahneman, the Eugene Higgins Professor of psychology, emeritus, and a Nobel laureate in economics, is one of 16 people who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest civilian honor in the United Continue Reading →

Focus on undergraduate research: Power grid solutions in Nigeria

GROWING UP IN LAGOS, NIGERIA, Oladoyin Phillips was accustomed to the power outages that struck just as she was about to use her computer or charge her cellphone. “I was frustrated on those afternoons,” she Continue Reading →

Fragile families, fragile children

Relationships are complicated in the best of times, but even more so for unmarried parents and their children. Children born to unmarried parents encounter considerable instability in their family life when their biological parents end Continue Reading →

The rising cost of health care: Students examine policy solutions

With health care costs soaring, opinions abound on the best way to control costs without sacrificing patient outcomes. This past academic year, as part of their senior thesis research, several top students from the Department Continue Reading →

Activism Shapes Africa Scholar

Leonard Wantchekon’s education began  as a young child in his home village of Zagnanado, in the West African nation of Benin, where elementary school classes gave way to long soccer games and evenings of storytelling Continue Reading →

Race and incarceration rates: Student researcher explores solutions

African Americans made up 40 percent of incarcerated individuals in the United States in 2012, despite being only 13 percent of the American population, according to the United States Census Bureau. Danielle Pingue, Class of Continue Reading →

The social network: Program combats bullying

New laws and policies to address harassment and intimidation in schools are sprouting up in every state. But can laws and polices put a stop to bullying, or do students play a role? Psychologist Elizabeth Continue Reading →

Immigration policy is ripe for reform

Family unification provisions enacted in the 1960s have contributed to population aging in the United States, according to an analysis by Marta Tienda, an immigration and policy expert at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Continue Reading →