“Doing science,” rather than “being scientists,” more encouraging to girls, new research shows

Asking young girls to “do science” leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to “be scientists,” finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton Continue Reading →

Treasure in ancient trash

By Kevin McElwee Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s research. The lumpy rock is Continue Reading →

Four Princeton faculty members win Guggenheim Fellowships

By the Office of Communications Four Princeton faculty members, representing a range of subjects in the humanities, have received Guggenheim Fellowships. Brooke Holmes, the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities and professor of classics, Continue Reading →

New arts complex opens

By Staff The new 22-acre Lewis Arts complex includes spaces for the creation and performance of dance, theater, music and more. The new multi-building Lewis Arts complex on the south edge of campus significantly expands Continue Reading →

Bound in wedlock: Professor of history explores slavery’s shackles on black families

For her new book, Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century (Harvard University Press, 2017), Tera Hunter, a professor of history and African American studies, meticulously researched court records, legal Continue Reading →

At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present

Authors: Maria DiBattista, Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English, professor of English and comparative literature; and Deborah Epstein Nord, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature and professor of English Publisher: Princeton University Press, Continue Reading →

Designing San Francisco: Art, Land and Urban Renewal in the City by the Bay

Author: Alison Isenberg, professor of history Publisher: Princeton University Press, September 2017 Designing San Francisco is the previously untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their modern shape amid clashing visions Continue Reading →

Historian of religion Elaine Pagels awarded National Humanities Medal

PHOTO BY MARK CZAJKOWSKI Elaine Pagels, an authority on the religions of late antiquity and the author of The Gnostic Gospels and Beyond Belief: The Secret Gospel of Thomas, received the 2015 National Humanities Medal. Continue Reading →

New World A-Coming: Black Religion and Racial Identity During the Great Migration

Author: Judith Weisenfeld, the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion Publisher: New York University Press, February 2017 When Joseph Nathaniel Beckles registered for the draft in the 1942, he rejected the racial categories Continue Reading →

Eight win Guggenheim Fellowships

PHOTO CREDITS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: TOP ROW: JOHN LUCAS, RICHARD SODEN, PETER HURLEY, HANNAH DUNPHY BOTTOM ROW: DAVID BROWN, NINA KATCHADOURIAN, DENISE APPLEWHITE, JILL DOLAN Eight Princeton faculty members have received 2017 Guggenheim Fellowships Continue Reading →

Tracy K. Smith named U.S. Poet Laureate

PHOTO BY DENISE APPLEWHITE Tracy K. Smith has been named the Library of Congress’s 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, for 2017-18. Smith is the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and a Continue Reading →

Unscripted America: Indigenous Languages and the Origins of a Literary Nation

Author: Sarah Rivett, associate professor of English and American studies Publisher: Oxford University Press, October 2017 In 1664, French Jesuit Louis Nicolas arrived in Quebec. Upon first hearing Ojibwe, Nicolas observed that he had encountered Continue Reading →

Historian and neuroscientist team up for podcast

By Yasemin Saplakoglu When history professor Julian Zelizer and neuroscientist Sam Wang started the podcast Politics and Polls prior to last year’s presidential election, they never dreamed it would still be going a year later. Continue Reading →

Race for profits

Research on the 1970s urban housing crisis exposes a familiar history By Catherine Zandonella PREDATORY LENDERS. Subprime and no-doc loans. Mortgage-backed securities. Mass foreclosures that disproportionately impacted minority homeowners. Sound like 2008? It was 1972. Continue Reading →

Poetic Trespass: Writing Between Hebrew and Arabic in Israel/Palestine

Author: Lital Levy Publisher: Princeton University Press, 2014 A Palestinian-Israeli poet declares a new state whose language, “Homelandic,” is a combination of Arabic and Hebrew. A Jewish- Israeli author imagines a “language plague” that infects Continue Reading →

Sound Rising from the Paper: Nineteenth-Century Martial Arts Fiction and the Chinese Acoustic Imagination

Author: Paize Keulemans Publisher: Harvard University Press, 2014 Chinese martial arts novels from the late 19th century are filled with a host of suggestive sounds. Characters cuss and curse in colorful dialect accents, vendor calls Continue Reading →

Ashes, images and the survival of democracy

Ashes, images and the survival of democracy: Nathan Arrington searches for meaning in ancient Athens’ public cemetery By Catherine Zandonella IT’S AN OVERCAST AND WINDY DAY, cold for June, but a strawberry stand across the Continue Reading →

RESILIENT SHORES: After Sandy, climate scientists and architects explore how to co-exist with rising tides

AFTER THE WIND, RAIN AND WAVES of Hurricane Sandy subsided, many of the modest homes in the Chelsea Heights section of Atlantic City, New Jersey, were filled to their windows with murky water. Residents returned Continue Reading →