Self-powered system makes smart windows smarter

By Sharon Adarlo A new solar cell technology could make it inexpensive to create and install smart windows that automatically vary their tint to augment lighting, heating and cooling systems Continue Reading →

Probing the genetic basis for dog-human relationships

By Pooja Makhijani A new study has identified genetic changes that are linked to dogs’ human-directed social behaviors and suggests there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior Continue Reading →

Emily Carter awarded Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics

PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY CROW Emily Carter, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been named the recipient of the 2017 Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics Continue Reading →

At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present

Authors: Maria DiBattista, Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English, professor of English and comparative literature; and Deborah Epstein Nord, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature and professor of Continue Reading →

Designing San Francisco: Art, Land and Urban Renewal in the City by the Bay

Author: Alison Isenberg, professor of history Publisher: Princeton University Press, September 2017 Designing San Francisco is the previously untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their Continue Reading →

New World A-Coming: Black Religion and Racial Identity During the Great Migration

Author: Judith Weisenfeld, the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion Publisher: New York University Press, February 2017 When Joseph Nathaniel Beckles registered for the draft in the 1942, Continue Reading →

Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy and Security

Author: Brian Kernighan, professor of computer science Publisher: Princeton University Press, January 2017 Computers are everywhere. Some of them are highly visible, in laptops, tablets, cellphones and smart watches. But Continue Reading →

Eight win Guggenheim Fellowships

PHOTO CREDITS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: TOP ROW: JOHN LUCAS, RICHARD SODEN, PETER HURLEY, HANNAH DUNPHY BOTTOM ROW: DAVID BROWN, NINA KATCHADOURIAN, DENISE APPLEWHITE, JILL DOLAN Eight Princeton faculty members Continue Reading →

The Little Book of Black Holes

Authors: Steven Gubser and Frans Pretorius, professors of physics Publisher: Princeton University Press, October 2017 Black holes, predicted by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity more than a century ago, Continue Reading →

Atom catcher: With lasers and magnets, Waseem Bakr traps atoms for study under the microscope

By Bennett McIntosh THE COLDEST SPOT on the Princeton campus is a cluster of a few thousand atoms suspended above a table in Waseem Bakr’s laboratory. When trapped in a Continue Reading →

CITIES: Resilient • Adaptable • Livable • Smart

Innovations in building materials, design, water systems and power grids are helping to make cities more livable, say researchers in Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science By Bennett McIntosh Continue Reading →

Better living through behavioral science

How the psychology of human behavior is helping tackle society’s biggest problems By Wendy Plump SUPPOSE someone approaches you on the street with the following proposition: You can receive either Continue Reading →

Bright future: Princeton researchers unlock the potential of light to perform previously impossible feats

By Bennett McIntosh One hundred years ago, Italian chemist Giacomo Ciamician predicted a future society that would run on sunlight. In a paper presented in 1912 to an international meeting Continue Reading →

Tiny delivery capsules for new drugs

Some drugs cannot be delivered via a normal pill or injection because they cannot readily dissolve in water. About 40 percent of new pharmaceuticals have this hydrophobic (water-fearing) character, and Continue Reading →

Computer chip for point-of-care diagnosis

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Kaushik Sengupta and his team are developing a computer chip-based diagnostic system, which rests comfortably on a fingertip but contains hundreds of different sensors for Continue Reading →

Bioengineering: Unlocking the secrets of human health

By Takim Williams RED-HOT RIVERS OF MOLTEN COPPER and aluminum alloys streamed from one receptacle to another. As an undergraduate watching the demonstration in a materials science class, Clifford Brangwynne Continue Reading →

Janet Currie investigates the building blocks of children’s success

By Michael Hotchkiss TRAINED AS A LABOR ECONOMIST, Janet Currie earned her doctorate at Princeton by studying strikes and arbitration. But as she began her academic career in the late Continue Reading →