Going green: What we can learn from a little alga

By Yasemin Saplakoglu WE ARE CONCERNED, rightly so, about the amount of carbon dioxide accumulating in the Earth’s atmosphere. But to most plants, which use carbon for photosynthesis, the amount Continue Reading →

Coming home to document a rapidly changing China

By Catherine Zandonella SOCIOLOGIST Yu Xie is the director of Princeton’s Paul and Marcia Wythes Center on Contemporary China, which aims to conduct research on Chinese society through an interdisciplinary approach.  Continue Reading →

Diamonds’ flaws hold promise for new technologies

By Yasemin Saplakoglu DESPITE THEIR CHARM AND ALLURE, diamonds are rarely perfect. They have tiny defects that, to assistant professor Nathalie de Leon, make them ever so appealing. These atom-sized Continue Reading →

Let it flow: The ideas, the creativity, the findings, the impacts, the benefits to society

By Yasemin Saplakoglu THE RESEARCHERS in Princeton’s Complex Fluids laboratory are sometimes inspired by a cup of coffee or a permanent marker. Such everyday items may seem like odd subjects Continue Reading →

Lights, camera, action – of genes in development

By Yasemin Saplakoglu MOLECULAR BIOLOGIST MIKE LEVINE likes to recall his childhood when he talks about the reason he came to Princeton. “I grew up near Hollywood and I always loved Continue Reading →

Self-powered system makes smart windows smarter

By Sharon Adarlo A new solar cell technology could make it inexpensive to create and install smart windows that automatically vary their tint to augment lighting, heating and cooling systems Continue Reading →

Probing the genetic basis for dog-human relationships

By Pooja Makhijani A new study has identified genetic changes that are linked to dogs’ human-directed social behaviors and suggests there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior Continue Reading →

Emily Carter awarded Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics

PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY CROW Emily Carter, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been named the recipient of the 2017 Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics Continue Reading →

At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present

Authors: Maria DiBattista, Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English, professor of English and comparative literature; and Deborah Epstein Nord, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature and professor of Continue Reading →

Designing San Francisco: Art, Land and Urban Renewal in the City by the Bay

Author: Alison Isenberg, professor of history Publisher: Princeton University Press, September 2017 Designing San Francisco is the previously untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their Continue Reading →

New World A-Coming: Black Religion and Racial Identity During the Great Migration

Author: Judith Weisenfeld, the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion Publisher: New York University Press, February 2017 When Joseph Nathaniel Beckles registered for the draft in the 1942, Continue Reading →

Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy and Security

Author: Brian Kernighan, professor of computer science Publisher: Princeton University Press, January 2017 Computers are everywhere. Some of them are highly visible, in laptops, tablets, cellphones and smart watches. But Continue Reading →

Eight win Guggenheim Fellowships

PHOTO CREDITS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: TOP ROW: JOHN LUCAS, RICHARD SODEN, PETER HURLEY, HANNAH DUNPHY BOTTOM ROW: DAVID BROWN, NINA KATCHADOURIAN, DENISE APPLEWHITE, JILL DOLAN Eight Princeton faculty members Continue Reading →

The Little Book of Black Holes

Authors: Steven Gubser and Frans Pretorius, professors of physics Publisher: Princeton University Press, October 2017 Black holes, predicted by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity more than a century ago, Continue Reading →

Better decision-making for the planet

By Yasemin Saplakoglu We might think we have control of the mix of decisions we make during the day. But it turns out that our brain gives us subconscious nudges, Continue Reading →

Historian and neuroscientist team up for podcast

By Yasemin Saplakoglu When history professor Julian Zelizer and neuroscientist Sam Wang started the podcast Politics and Polls prior to last year’s presidential election, they never dreamed it would still Continue Reading →