Cancer connection

Combining therapeutics with dietarychanges could prove effective against some forms of cancer. Continue Reading →

Climate in crisis

Advances in reclaiming carbon from wastewater, lithium-ion-battery recycling, innovative building materials and new approaches to urban infrastructures are active areas of research at Princeton. Continue Reading →

Public-private partnerships propel fusion research

The quest to develop a safe, clean and virtually limitless source of energy for the future has brought the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) into partnership with private companies. PPPL has teamed with five technology companies in the United States, Canada and Great Britain to unlock the potential of fusion, the process that powers the sun and stars, to meet humanity’s ever-growing electricity needs. Continue Reading →

Conversation spreads droplets more than six feet indoors

researchers have found that ordinary conversation creates a conical, “jet-like” airflow that carries a spray of tiny droplets from a speaker’s mouth across meters of an interior space.
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Tempest in a laptop

Ning Lin, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, and her research group use computers to whip up virtual hurricanes that help policymakers evaluate the risks of severe storms in regions such as New York City, where such storms are rare but potentially devastating. Continue Reading →

Deemed unfit for freedom

Weisenfeld’s research tracks the rise in psychiatry as a field of science and the parallel ascent of the discipline’s racialized theories about African American religious practices and mental health. Continue Reading →

Of lava lamps and living cells

Professor Clifford Brangwynne sees similarities between living cells and salad dressing, in which oil and vinegar separate according to the laws of physics. The idea has caught on. Continue Reading →

Cascade sets the stage for superconductivity in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene

Princeton researchers used scanning tunneling microscopy to observe what happens when they add electrons to magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene. They observed a cascade of transitions in the electronic properties, patterns that could help unlock how superconductivity emerge in these materials. Continue Reading →

Princeton researcher bringing single-cell gene expression studies to a benchtop near you

: Princeton researcher Britt Adamson, together with collaborators, developed improvements to high-throughput technologies that can be used to explore how cells respond to experimentally-induced changes in gene expression. Continue Reading →

Researchers identify factors essential for chronic hepatitis B infection

A study published in the journal Nature Microbiology identified factors that the hepatitis B virus uses when establishing long-term infection in the liver. The findings could help lead to treatment strategies for chronic HBV infection, a condition that increases the risk of developing liver cancer and is responsible for almost 900,000 deaths worldwide each year. Continue Reading →

Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes

Mathematical modeling helps researchers to understand how enzymes in the body work to ensure normal functioning, and how genetic mutations alter the enzymes’ behavior in ways that cause disease, including cancer. Continue Reading →

New material has highest electron mobility among known layered magnetic materials

A new material from researchers at Princeton University has properties that make it a promising candidate for new areas like magnetic twistronic devices and spintronics, as well as advances in data storage and device design. Continue Reading →

Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer

Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube. Continue Reading →

Motion-capture technology assists in neuroscience studies

A new technology can automatically track animals’ body parts in video to measure the behavior of animals. Continue Reading →

A small number of wells produce large emissions

A team of Princeton researchers has found that, in one of the biggest gas-producing regions, most of these emissions come from a tiny subset of the wells. Continue Reading →

Neuroscientists develop models to identify internal states of the brain

Researchers studied the courtship behaviors of fruit flies to gain insight into how the brain creates “internal states” which culminate from mood, past experiences and other variables. Continue Reading →

Princeton scientists discover surprising quantum effect in an exotic superconductor

Superconductors are already in use in various capacities, but newer iron-based superconductors are an active area of investigation. Researchers led by a Princeton team have studied what happens to the superconducting nature of these materials when impurities are added. The results shed light on how superconductivity behaves in these materials Continue Reading →

Princeton researchers explore how a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation

A new study yields insights into how an organelle called the pyrenoid, which helps algae remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, forms inside the cell via a process similar to how oil separates from water. Continue Reading →

How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells

Princeton University researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and delta virus (HDV). The paper describing their Continue Reading →

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing

As mysterious as the Italian scientist for which it is named, the Majorana particle is one of the most compelling quests in physics. Its fame stems from its strange properties – it is the only Continue Reading →

Danger avoidance can be genetically encoded for four generations

Princeton University researchers have discovered that learned behaviors in worms of the species C. elegans can be inherited for multiple generations, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells. The paper detailing this Continue Reading →

“Doing science,” rather than “being scientists,” more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can “be scientists,” but remain more confident that they can “do science,” finds a new psychology study by researchers at New Continue Reading →

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C

Small differences in a liver cell protein have significant impacts on hepatitis C virus replication in mice and humans, findings that could facilitate the development of a mouse model of the infection. The report, led Continue Reading →

For infection-fighting cells, a guideline for expanding the troops

T cells are like the special ops forces of the immune system, detecting and killing infected cells. When a new threat is detected, the cells ramp up from just a few sentry cells to a Continue Reading →

A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Taking their name from an intricate Japanese basket pattern, kagome magnets are thought to have electronic properties that could be valuable for future quantum devices and applications. Theories predict that some electrons in these materials Continue Reading →

“Doing science,” rather than “being scientists,” more encouraging to girls, new research shows

Asking young girls to “do science” leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to “be scientists,” finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton Continue Reading →

Controllable electron flow in quantum wires

Princeton University researchers have demonstrated a new way of making controllable “quantum wires” in the presence of a magnetic field, according to a new study published online today in the journal Nature. The researchers detected channels Continue Reading →

Turning up the heat on the search for better plastics

By Scott Lyon If you have ever poured hot coffee into a cheap plastic cup, you may recall that sinking feeling as the cup seems to wilt. Not quite solid, not quite liquid, the cup Continue Reading →

Finding meaning among the junk

By Kevin McElwee Only about 10 percent of the human genome are actually genes. The other 90 percent? Once called “junk DNA,” researchers now know that this genetic material contains on-off switches that can activate Continue Reading →

Engine of cosmic evolution: Eve Ostriker looks under the hood

By Catherine Zandonella Outside Eve Ostriker’s office door stretches the universe, dotted with orange galaxies against the black backdrop of space. The mural lines the hallway in Princeton’s astrophysical sciences building, where it inspires Ostriker Continue Reading →

Going quantum to unlock plants’ secrets

By Kevin McElwee When it comes to green living, nobody does it better than plants. When plants convert light into fuel through photosynthesis, not a single particle of light is wasted. If we could unlock Continue Reading →