ROBERTO CAR receives American Chemistry Society national award

Roberto Car

Roberto Car (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

Roberto Car, the Ralph W. *31 Dornte Professor in Chemistry, was recognized for his innovative research by the American Chemical Society (ACS) during a ceremony March 15, 2016. He received the ACS Award in Theoretical Chemistry for the “depth, originality and scientific significance” of his work.

Car’s research explores materials at the level of atoms and electrons. He uses theoretical tools and numerical simulations to gain insight into the chemical and physical processes underlying chemical reactions. While Car’s research is theoretical and fundamental, his discoveries may have technological implications that can aid in the design of new materials and devices with desirable properties. Car, who is a professor of chemistry and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, is known for the invention of an ab initio moleculardynamics method with Italian physicist Michele Parrinello that is now a standard tool for molecular simulation. The method has been applied to a variety of problems in condensed matter and chemical physics, materials science, geosciences, chemistry and biochemistry.

 

JANE COX receives the Ruth Morley Design Award from the League of Professional Theatre Women

Jane Cox

Jane Cox (Photo by Evan Alexander)

Jane Cox, senior lecturer in theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts and director of the Program in Theater, was presented with the Ruth Morley Design Award from the League of Professional Theatre Women on May 3, 2016. The annual award recognizes leading female designers working in theater and film. Cox is an award-winning lighting designer and has been a lecturer at Princeton since 2007. Her recent projects include Hamlet, starring English actor Benedict Cumberbatch and directed by Lyndsey Turner, and the new musical Amelie, directed by Pam MacKinnon. She received a 2016 Drama Desk Award nomination for her lighting design on the Broadway revival of The Color Purple.

SIMON LEVIN wins National Medal of Science for unraveling ecological complexity

Simon Levin

Simon Levin (Photo by Brian Wilson)

Simon Levin, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, received a National Medal of Science, the nation’s highest scientific honor. Levin was honored at a White House ceremony in early 2016 along with eight fellow Medal of Science recipients, and eight recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

Levin focuses his research on complexity, particularly how large-scale patterns — such as at the ecosystem level — are maintained by small-scale behavioral and evolutionary factors at the level of individual organisms. His work uses observational data and mathematical models to explore topics such as biological diversity, the evolution of structure and organization, and the management of public goods and shared resources. While primarily related to ecology, Levin’s work also has analyzed conservation, financial and economic systems, and the dynamics of infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance.

PAUL CHIRIK receives Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award

PAUL CHIRIK

Paul Chirik (Photo by C. Todd Reichart)

Paul Chirik, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Chemistry, was among five recipients nationwide of the 2016 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards presented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chirik was recognized for discovering a new class of catalysts that produce silicones without using hard-to-obtain platinum, which could dramatically reduce the mining of ore and reduce costs, greenhouse-gas emissions and waste. The winners were recognized during a ceremony June 13, 2016.

MARINA RUSTOW, historian of the medieval Middle East, wins MacArthur Fellowship

Marina Rustow

Marina Rustow (Photo courtesy of John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Marina Rustow, the Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East and professor of Near Eastern studies and history, has been awarded a 2015 MacArthur Fellowship.

Rustow is among 24 scientists, artists, scholars and activists who will each receive $625,000 no-strings-attached grants over a five-year period from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The MacArthur Fellows Program awards unrestricted fellowships to talented individuals who have shown originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a capacity for self-direction.

Rustow’s area of specialization is the medieval Middle East, particularly texts from the Cairo Geniza, a cache of more than 300,000 folio pages of legal documents, letters and literary materials that span more than a millennium and were preserved in an Egyptian synagogue. In its announcement, the MacArthur Foundation cited Rustow for research on the Geniza texts “that shed new light on Jewish life and on the broader society of the medieval Middle East. Rustow’s approach to this archive goes beyond decoding documents, in itself a formidable task, to questioning the relationship between subjects and medieval states and asking what that relationship tells us about power and the negotiation of religious boundaries.”

GUGGENHEIM FELLOWSHIPS awarded

Two faculty members and a visiting lecturer have received 2016 fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation in recognition of their excellence in scholarship or creative work. The fellowships were awarded to Daniel Garber, the A. Watson Armour, III, University Professor of Philosophy, for his project, How Philosophy Became Modern in the 17th Century; Juri Seo, assistant professor of music, for music composition; and Raphael Xavier, a visiting lecturer in dance and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for choreography.

Garber researches the history of philosophy and the history of science in the early modern period, especially the questions of what is considered philosophy and what is considered science, and how that has changed over time. He is the author of numer- ous works on the science and philosophy of Galileo Galilei, René Descartes, Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton and others.

Seo is a composer and pianist who writes music that is unified and fluid but also complex in structure. She brings influences from music of the past century into her compositions, which are serious and humorous, lyrical and violent, and use fast-changing dynamics. She has earned many composition honors and joined the Princeton faculty in fall 2014.

A hip-hop practitioner since 1983, Xavier is a choreographer with a profound understanding of movement, sound and musicality. In addition to his success at integrating hip-hop styles into dance theater, he has created an approach to dance that helps with physical healing and makes movement accessible to any body type. His artistic work also includes photography, film and music.

Raphael Xavier

Raphael Xavier (Photo by Brian Mengini)

Juri Seo

Juri Seo (Photo by Andrew Wilkinson)

Daniel Garber

Daniel Garber (Photo by Nick Barberio)